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The Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) as a tool for cancer epidemiological surveillance

  • Pablo Fernández-Navarro
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Cancer and Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Centre for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Avda. Monforte de Lemos 5, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
    Affiliations
    Cancer and Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Avda Monforte de Lemos, 5, 28029 Madrid, Spain

    Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública — CIBERESP), Spain
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  • Gonzalo López-Abente
    Affiliations
    Cancer and Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Avda Monforte de Lemos, 5, 28029 Madrid, Spain

    Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública — CIBERESP), Spain
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  • Carmen Salido-Campos
    Affiliations
    Admission and Clinical Documentation Department, Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, Spain
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  • José Miguel Sanz-Anquela
    Affiliations
    Cancer Registry and Pathology Department, Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, Spain

    Department of Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Alcalá, Spain
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Published:August 05, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2016.06.038

      Highlights

      • Accuracy of the cancer incidence in general measured by MBDS has not been evaluated.
      • Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) has a sensitivity to detect cases of cancer above 60%.
      • MBDS has high specificity and NPV, and moderate NPV to detect cases of cancer.
      • The performance of MBDS in the detection of tumors depends on the type of cancer.
      • “Minimum Basic Data Set” could be a valuable tool in the monitoring of cancer.

      Abstract

      Objective

      This work aims to evaluate the Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) as a data source in the detection of malignant tumors and explore its usefulness as a tool for epidemiological surveillance of cancer.

      Materials and methods

      MBDS hospital data discharge from Prince of Asturias University Hospital (HUPA, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain) and cancer cases recorded in the Hospital Cancer Registry (HCR) have been collected for the period between January 2012 and June 2014. Both databases have been linked by the number of clinical history. For the process of evaluation of MBDS, the types of cancer with more than 100 cases have been analyzed and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values(PPV, NPV) of MBDS were calculated using as reference the diagnoses recorded in the HCR.

      Results

      3438 cases of cancer were accounted in the MBDS and 2445 in the HCR. The MBDS has a sensitivity to detect cases of cancer above 60%, although it varies depending on the type of tumor, reaching the highest values for bladder cancer. The specificity and the VPN were very high for all types of cancer studied, always on top of 95%. Finally, the VPP is generally moderate, between 50% and 70%.

      Conclusions

      The systematic exploitation of the MBDS can provide a valuable tool in the monitoring of cancer by its acceptable sensitivity and high specificity, allowing obtaining information without the delays involved in the consolidation of the annotations of the HCR. Furthermore, its use could partly mitigate the lack of data in important regions of Spain.

      Keywords

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