Advertisement

Admissions for certain conditions show explosive growth in England following a sudden and unexpected increase in deaths

Published:March 15, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2018.03.005
      Physicians will be aware that workload seems to be inexplicably higher at sometimes than others. Interestingly, almost half of a person's entire lifetime utilization of acute inpatient care occurs in the last year of life, and more specifically in the last six months [
      • Aaltonen M.
      • Forma L.
      • Pulkki J.
      • Raitanen J.
      • Rissanen P.
      • Jylha M.
      Changes in older people's care profiles during the last 2 years of life, 1996–1998 and 2011–2013: a retrospective nationwide study in Finland.
      ,
      • Jones R.
      Periods of unexplained higher deaths and medical admissions have occurred previously – but were apparently ignored, misinterpreted or not investigated.
      ]. Could it be that the trends in the absolute number of deaths is the explanatory variable?

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to European Journal of Internal Medicine
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Aaltonen M.
        • Forma L.
        • Pulkki J.
        • Raitanen J.
        • Rissanen P.
        • Jylha M.
        Changes in older people's care profiles during the last 2 years of life, 1996–1998 and 2011–2013: a retrospective nationwide study in Finland.
        BMJ Open. 2017; 7e015130
        • Jones R.
        Periods of unexplained higher deaths and medical admissions have occurred previously – but were apparently ignored, misinterpreted or not investigated.
        Eur J Intern Med. 2018; (in press)
        • Jones R.
        Deaths in 2017 reached a new (unexpected) high.
        Brit J Healthc Assist. 2018; 24 ([in press])
        • Jones R.
        Age-specific and year of birth changes in hospital admissions during a period of unexplained higher deaths in England.
        Eur J Intern Med. 2017; 45: 2-4https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2017.09.039
        • Nicholl J.
        Case-mix adjustment in non-randomised observational evaluations: the constant risk fallacy.
        J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007; 61: 1010-1013https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.2007.061747
        • NHS England
        NHS five year forward view.
        in: Recap Briefing for the Health Select Committee on Technical Modelling and Scenarios. May 2016
        • Oliver D.
        “Progressive dwindling”, frailty, and realistic expectations.
        BMJ. 2017; 358: j3954https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j3954
        • Singer A.
        • Meeker D.
        • Teno J.
        • Lynn J.
        • Lunney J.
        • Lorenz K.
        Symptom trends in the last year of life from 1998 to 2010. A cohort study.
        Ann Intern Med. 2015; 162: 175-183
        • Jones R.
        A study of an unexplained and large increase in respiratory deaths in England and Wales: is the pattern of diagnoses consistent with the potential involvement of cytomegalovirus?.
        Brit. J. Med. Medical. 2014; 4: 5179-5192https://doi.org/10.9734/BJMMR/2014/11382
        • Wittenberg R.
        • Sharpin L.
        • McCormick B.
        • Hurst J.
        The ageing society and emergency hospital admissions.
        Health Policy. 2017; 121: 923-928