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Creating a list of low-value health care interventions according to medical students perspective

Published:April 04, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2018.03.018
      In 2010, The Choosing Wisely campaign, launched by the American Board of Internal Medicine sought to help physicians and patients engage in conversations about unnecessary tests, treatments and procedures [
      • Wolfson D.
      • Santa J.
      • Slass L.
      Engaging physicians and consumers in conversations about treatment overuse and waste: a short history of the choosing wisely campaign.
      ]. The idea emerged of creating “top 5” lists of low-value health care activities as a way to confront rising medical costs and encourage cost-conscious care [
      • Good Stewardship Working Group
      The “top 5” lists in primary care: meeting the responsibility of professionalism.
      ]. The initial goal was not necessarily to reduce costs but rather to tackle the erroneous assumption that more care is always better according to a quality and safety perspective. The Choosing Wisely campaign spread rapidly, being adopted in more than 15 other countries. In 2014, the Swiss Society of General Internal Medicine launched smarter medicine campaign and published the first top five list for ambulatory medicine extending to the hospital setting subsequently [
      • Selby K.
      • Gaspoz J.-M.
      • Rodondi N.
      • Neuner-Jehle S.
      • Perrier A.
      • Zeller A.
      • et al.
      Creating a list of low-value health care activities in Swiss Primary Care.
      ]. Recently, other specialties joined the movement such as intensive care, geriatric and gastroenterology [
      • Levinson W.
      • Kallewaard M.
      • Bhatia R.S.
      • Wolfson D.
      • Shortt S.
      • Kerr E.A.
      • et al.
      “Choosing Wisely”: a growing international campaign.
      ]. Overall in Switzerland, the campaign appears to thrive and is mostly welcomed by physicians from most specialties, general practice being the most studied as of now [
      • Selby K.
      • Cornuz J.
      • Cohidon C.
      • Gaspoz J.-M.
      • Senn N.
      How do Swiss general practitioners agree with and report adhering to a top-five list of unnecessary tests and treatments? Results of a cross-sectional survey.
      ]. The project advocates for a better use of limited resources through a reconsideration of the usefulness of common medical acts in the light of the evidence-based medicine and the less is more philosophy.
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      References

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        Engaging physicians and consumers in conversations about treatment overuse and waste: a short history of the choosing wisely campaign.
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        Creating a list of low-value health care activities in Swiss Primary Care.
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        “Choosing Wisely”: a growing international campaign.
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        How do Swiss general practitioners agree with and report adhering to a top-five list of unnecessary tests and treatments? Results of a cross-sectional survey.
        Eur J Gen Pract. 2018 Dec; 24: 32-38
      1. American Board of Internal Medicine. Chosing Wisely Recommandations [Internet]. [cited 2018 Mar 14]. Available from: http://www.choosingwisely.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Choosing-Wisely-Recommendations.pdf.