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High body mass index, healthy metabolic profile and low visceral adipose tissue: The paradox is to call it obesity again

Published:April 07, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2018.03.019
      During the last three decades, the worldwide prevalence of obesity has nearly doubled, and the mean body mass index has increased worldwide by 0.4 kg/m2 per decade for men and 0.5 kg/m2 per decade for women [
      • Vecchié A.
      • Dallegri F.
      • Carbone F.
      • Bonaventura A.
      • Liberale L.
      • Portincasa P.
      • et al.
      Obesity phenotypes and their paradoxical association with cardiovascular diseases.
      ,
      • Finucane M.M.
      • Stevens G.A.
      • Cowan M.J.
      • Danaei G.
      • Lin J.K.
      • Paciorek C.J.
      • et al.
      Global burden of metabolic risk factors of chronic diseases collaborating group (body mass index). National, regional, and global trends in body-mass index since 1980: Systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies with 960 country-years and 9.1 million participants.
      ], and continues to increase globally. The Global Burden of Disease study recently published [
      • Afshin A.
      • Forouzanfar M.H.
      • Reitsma M.B.
      • Sur P.
      • Estep K.
      • et al.
      GBD 2015 Obesity Collaborators
      Health effects of overweight and obesity in 195 countries over 25 years.
      ] showed a greater increase in the rate of exposure to high body mass index than in the rate of the related disease burden. The study, in which researchers assembled data from 195 countries to model trends in overweight and obesity and related morbidity and mortality, showed that the prevalence of obesity has more than doubled since 1980 and is now 5% in children and 12% in adults, closely mirroring similar global trends in type 2 diabetes. Moreover, apart from a possible recent plateau in the prevalence of obesity in high-income countries, the prevalence has increased in all other sociodemographic strata. These results undoubtedly offer a discouraging reminder that the global obesity epidemic is worsening in most parts of the world and that its implications regarding both physical health and economic health remain ominous [
      • Afshin A.
      • Forouzanfar M.H.
      • Reitsma M.B.
      • Sur P.
      • Estep K.
      • et al.
      GBD 2015 Obesity Collaborators
      Health effects of overweight and obesity in 195 countries over 25 years.
      ].

      Keywords

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