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Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of imported malaria in adults in Milan, Italy, 2010–2015

      Malaria is the most common and lethal parasitic disease worldwide with an estimated 216 million of cases and 445,000 deaths in 2016 [
      • World Health Organization. World Malaria Report 2017
      Geneva: World Health Organization.
      ]. In Europe, where malaria has been eradicated, there were over 8000 imported cases in 2015, two-thirds of which reported in France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain and Germany.

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        Geneva: World Health Organization.
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