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Frailty is associated with multimorbidities due to decreased physical reserve independent of age

Published:February 02, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2019.01.017
      We read the study of Vancampfort et al. entitled “Handgrip strength, chronic physical conditions and physical multimorbidity in middle-aged and older adults in six low- and middle income countries” with great interest [
      • Vancampfort D.
      • Stubbs B.
      • Firth J.
      • Koyanagi A.
      Handgrip strength, chronic physical conditions and physical multimorbidity in middle-aged and older adults in six low-and middle income countries.
      ]. In this paper, community-based data of 34,129 individuals aged ≥50 years from the World Health Organization's Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health were analyzed. The authors investigated the associations between handgrip strength, chronic physical conditions, and physical multimorbidity (i.e., ≥2 chronic conditions) among community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults using nationally representative data from six in low- and middle-income countries. The authors highlighted that weak handgrip strength correlated with a higher prevalence of physical conditions and multimorbidity. Observed results were similar in middle-aged versus old age people and, in female versus male participants respectively.

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