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A six-year microbiologic study of hospital-acquired and health-care associated parapneumonic pleural infection

Published:March 09, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2019.03.003
      Hospital-acquired (HA) pleural infections, i.e. those with onset of over 48 h upon hospitalization, are associated with high rates of mortality [
      • Koma Y.
      • Inoue S.
      • Oda N.
      • Yokota N.
      • Tamai K.
      • Matsumoto Y.
      • et al.
      Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with community-acquired, health care-associated, and hospital-acquired empyema.
      ]. Health-care associated (HCA) pleural infections are defined as those manifested at hospital admission or within 48 h of admission in patients complying with one of the following criteria: residence in a long-term-care facility, hospitalization within the last four weeks and receipt of intravenous medical therapy within the previous 30 days [
      • Asai N.
      • Suematsu H.
      • Hagihara M.
      • Nishiyama N.
      • Kato H.
      • Sakanashi D.
      • et al.
      The etiology and bacteriology of healthcare-associated empyema are quite different from those of community-acquired empyema.
      ]. The microbiology of HA and HCA-pleural infections in Greece, has not been investigated so far and currently, empirical antimicrobial therapy is based on microbiological data available from other countries. We therefore aimed to identify and compare the microbiological profile (causative pathogen and drug-sensitivity) responsible for HA and HCA-pleural infections in Greece.

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