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Interleukin 10 related to lymphopenia in lupus

  • A. Dima
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Carol Davila UMF, Dionisie Lupu Street 37, RO-020022 Bucharest S2, Romania.
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania

    Department of Internal Medicine, Colentina Research Center, Colentina Clinical Hospital, Romania
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  • I. Pricopi
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania
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  • E. Balanescu
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, Colentina Research Center, Colentina Clinical Hospital, Romania
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  • P. Balanescu
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania

    Department of Internal Medicine, Colentina Research Center, Colentina Clinical Hospital, Romania
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  • C. Baicus
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania

    Department of Internal Medicine, Colentina Research Center, Colentina Clinical Hospital, Romania
    Search for articles by this author
Published:April 26, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2019.04.012
      Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune condition characterized by a wide range of cytokines and antibodies production. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) is one of the most studied cytokines, with pleiomorphic functions, also involved in lymphocytes cell growth and differentiation. Most studies identified higher IL-10 levels in lupus patients when compared to control subjects and also significant correlations of serum IL-10 with lupus disease activity and anti-DNA titers (revised by Peng et al) [
      • Peng H.
      • Wang W.
      • Zhou M.
      • Li R.
      • Pan H.F.
      • Ye D.Q.
      Role of interleukin-10 and interleukin-10 receptor in systemic lupus erythematosus.
      ]. However, treatments targeting interleukins have failed to be successful in lupus patients, therefore there is need to identify the relation of certain cytokines with particular lupus organ impairments [
      • Dima A.
      • Jurcut C.
      • Balanescu P.
      • Balanescu E.
      • Badea C.
      • Caraiola S.
      • et al.
      Clinical significance of serum and urinary interleukin-6 in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.
      ].

      Keywords

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