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Predictors of mortality of bloodstream infections among internal medicine patients: Mind the complexity of the septic population!

  • Alberto Tosoni
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatogastroenterology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy
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  • Giovanni Addolorato
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatogastroenterology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy

    Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
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  • Antonio Gasbarrini
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatogastroenterology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy

    Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
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  • Salvatore De Cosmo
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Sciences, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy
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  • Antonio Mirijello
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Medical Sciences, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, v.le Cappuccini, 71013 San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy.
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Sciences, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy
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  • on behalf of the Internal Medicine Sepsis Study Group
    Author Footnotes
    1 The authors in the Internal Medicine Sepsis Study Group are listed in Appendix A section.
  • Author Footnotes
    1 The authors in the Internal Medicine Sepsis Study Group are listed in Appendix A section.
      We read with great interest the article by Papadimitriou-Olivgeris and colleagues [
      • Papadimitriou-Olivgeris M.
      • Psychogiou R.
      • Garessus J.
      • Camaret A.
      • Fourre N.
      • Kanagaratnam S.
      • et al.
      Predictors of mortality of bloodstream infections among internal medicine patients in a Swiss hospital: role of quick sequential organ failure assessment.
      ] aiming to evaluate the predictors of mortality among internal medicine patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs). As main result, qSOFA, compared to SIRS and other severity scores, showed better performances in predicting mortality with a high negative predicting value [
      • Papadimitriou-Olivgeris M.
      • Psychogiou R.
      • Garessus J.
      • Camaret A.
      • Fourre N.
      • Kanagaratnam S.
      • et al.
      Predictors of mortality of bloodstream infections among internal medicine patients in a Swiss hospital: role of quick sequential organ failure assessment.
      ].

      Keywords

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