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Associating enterococcal endocarditis and colorectal neoplasia: is colonoscopy mandatory? – Authors’ reply

  • Lorenzo Bertolino
    Affiliations
    Department of Advanced Medical & Surgical Sciences, University of Campania ‘L. Vanvitelli’ Via De Crecchio 7, 80138 Napoli, Italy
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  • Maria Paola Ursi
    Affiliations
    Department of Advanced Medical & Surgical Sciences, University of Campania ‘L. Vanvitelli’ Via De Crecchio 7, 80138 Napoli, Italy
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  • Rosa Zampino
    Affiliations
    Department of Advanced Medical & Surgical Sciences, University of Campania ‘L. Vanvitelli’ Via De Crecchio 7, 80138 Napoli, Italy

    Unit of Infectious and Transplant Medicine, AORN Ospedali dei Colli-Monaldi Hospital Piazzale Ettore Ruggieri, 80131 Napoli, Italy
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  • Emanuele Durante-Mangoni
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Unit of Infectious and Transplant Medicine, AORN Ospedali dei Colli-Monaldi Hospital Piazzale Ettore Ruggieri, 80131 Napoli, Italy

    Department of Precision Medicine, University of Campania ‘L. Vanvitelli’ Via De Crecchio 7, 80138 Napoli, Italy
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Published:December 31, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2020.12.016
      We are glad to share with Corredoira and colleagues the interest for our recently published work regarding the relationship between Enteroccocus spp infective endocarditis (EIE) and colorectal neoplasm (CRN) [
      • Ursi MP
      • Bertolino L
      • Andini R
      • D'Amico F
      • Iossa D
      • Karruli A
      • et al.
      Enterococcal infective endocarditis is a marker of current occult or future incident colorectal neoplasia.
      ]. In their letter to the Editor, entitled “Associating enterococcal endocarditis and colorectal neoplasia: is colonoscopy mandatory?” [
      • Corredoira J
      • Romay E
      • Pericas JM
      • Mirò JM.
      Associating enterococcal endocarditis and colorectal neoplasia: is colonoscopy mandatory?.
      ], Correidora et al. highlight some of the key clinical features we also deem of utmost importance when approaching a patient with EIE. Indeed, as underscored by our Spanish colleagues, accumulating evidence from several retrospective studies supports the usefulness of colonoscopy not only in Streptococcus gallolyticus endocarditis but also in EIE, irrespective of whether the focus of infection is obvious or unknown [
      • Ursi MP
      • Bertolino L
      • Andini R
      • D'Amico F
      • Iossa D
      • Karruli A
      • et al.
      Enterococcal infective endocarditis is a marker of current occult or future incident colorectal neoplasia.
      ,
      • Corredoira J
      • Romay E
      • Pericas JM
      • Mirò JM.
      Associating enterococcal endocarditis and colorectal neoplasia: is colonoscopy mandatory?.
      ]. However, whether E. faecalis or S. gallolyticus infective endocarditis/bacteremia are an epiphenomenon of an already established CRN or play an active role in colorectal mucosal cell carcinogenesis remains unclear.

      Keywords

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