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How body composition may influence 24 hours blood pressure

Published:August 02, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2021.07.010
      In the last 10 years a global increase in risk exposure for attributable death has been observed for several factors, including ambient particulate matter pollution, drug use, high fasting plasma glucose, and high body mass index (BMI). High BMI was among the main 5 leading risks for DALY’ s in 2019, with high systolic blood pressure (BP), smoking, high fasting glucose and low birthweight [
      • GBD 2019 risk factors collaborators
      Global burden of 87 risk factors in 204 countries and territories, 1990-2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019.
      ].
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