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Willingness to participate in a lung cancer screening program: Patients’ attitudes towards United States Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF) recommendations

Published:December 20, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2021.12.004
      Like many other cancers, the prognosis of lung cancer largely depends on the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis and early detection could significantly improve cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Since the early 2000s, it has been shown that low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening could be valuable in early detection of lung cancer [
      • Team NLSTR.
      Reduced lung-cancer mortality with low-dose computed tomographic screening.
      ].

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