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A plaque on the right retropharyngeal wall

  • Author Footnotes
    1 The authors contributed equally for the present work.
    Yu-Kun Zhao
    Footnotes
    1 The authors contributed equally for the present work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Dermatology, The East Division of The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 183 Huangpu Rd. E., Guangzhou 510700, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 The authors contributed equally for the present work.
    Jing-Fa Lu
    Footnotes
    1 The authors contributed equally for the present work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Gannan Medical College, Ganzhou 341000, Jiangxi Province, China
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  • Di-Qing Luo
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Department of Dermatology, The East Division of The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 183 Huangpu Rd. E., Guangzhou 510700, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 The authors contributed equally for the present work.
Published:December 24, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2022.12.014
      A 25-year-old unmarried man was referred because of 1-week history of mildly sore throat, without association of systemic symptoms. He had an oral sex with a man 3 weeks before his presentation. His-past medical histories were unremarkable. Examination showed a well-delimited plaque with central ulceration on the right retropharyngeal wall, covered with white pseudomembranes and surrounded by erythema (Figure 1). No other rashes were detected elsewhere. Laboratory tests for complete blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, biochemistry profiles, C-reactive protein, anti-nuclear antibodies, auto-antibodies and HIV were either within normal limits or negative. Serological tests for syphilis revealed positivity for tolulized red unheated serum test (TRUST) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay with titres of 1:32 and 1:5120, respectively. His-partner was positive for syphilis.
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